Kiteworld Magazine- 2000km World Record

9 10 2011

Thanks to Ariana for putting this Kiteworld article together. It has been a long time coming but here it is, for those that haven’t seen it yet.


Have you ever thought about solo kiting for thousands of kilometres in a foreign country without a tent or your teddy bear?…Or a support boat? Or more than one kite? Yeah, me neither. Sounds a bit mad really. But 36-year old Wellington kitesurfer Louis Tapper kited the Brazilian coastline, from Salvador to Praia do Meio Beach in Sao Luis, breaking the record for the longest kite journey in the process. I checked in with him after his triumphant return to find out that he doesn’t dig the ‘crazy’ label, and that there were moments of ‘flow’ on his epic adventure.

Kiteworld Magazine Article





Surfing into the record books- Love Red magazine article

8 02 2011





Kiwi kite-surfer back in NZ after Brazil adventure

15 09 2010

By Jeff McTainsh

Wellington’s Louis Tapper has just completed a 2000km journey on his kite-board down the coast of Brazil.

As well as setting a new world record, the 36-year-old also raised money for SurfAid – a charity looking to help communities in isolated surfing regions in Indonesia.

Tapper is back to his day job in IT risk management after just completing one of the most high-risk adventures of his life.

“Great to be finished,” he says. “The world record was really just a by-product of the 2000km but I’m just happy to be finished and ready to do some stress-free kiting now.”

Tapper’s month-long voyage wasn’t so stress-free though; he surfed down along Brazil’s coastline from Salvador to Sao Luis.

Light winds and shallow reefs during the first half of his journey caused headaches for the 36-year-old – and that wasn’t his only issue.

“Couple of close calls with broken gear; had some line wraps around both of my feet at one point,” he says. “It took myself and a passing fisherman a good hour to unwrap me.”

With no support crew it was that kind of local hospitality that made Tapper’s journey a lot easier.

“Some stretches of the coast are very remote so I was having to stay on the beach or with fisherman in their huts with them.”

The flying Kiwi also became quite a hit with the locals.

“Every place I’d stop they’d be like, ‘Oh, you’re the guy that’s doing this kite surfing mad mission,’ so I think they had this word called ‘loco’ which translated in English means ‘crazy’.

Perhaps Tapper is loco – he doesn’t intend to be at his desk for long – he is already scheming his next risk management plan.

3 News





TV3

15 09 2010

Check out TV3 tonight (6pm) for a follow up story on the trip.





Jeri

9 09 2010

Arriving in Jeri felt like arriving in Vegas after being in the countryside. This weekend was busier that most because of a Brazilian holiday.

We arrived in a 5 person vehicle with 8 people a ton of windsurf kit and kites. The party started as soon as we arrived at 10.30 and didn’t let up until the sun rose. The only challenge then became making it up again for sunset.

Every night from 5 until 6, everyone congregates on the nearby sunset dune to watch the amazing sun go down. Sunset watching had a tribal feel to it with people applauding as the sun disappeared off into the water.

Jeri has been a internationally famous windsurf location for some time and more recently for kitesurfing. It’s one of the windier spots on the North Eastern coast. The unique thing about this place is the sand lined streets, funky bars and restaurants.

Today I sat in Club Ventos overlooking the bay and watched life go by. The place is in a prime location next to the designated world class windsurf area. Prea seems to be more popular for kiters and makes for a great downwind at sunset back to Jeri.

The end of my trip is rapidly nearing the end, so its back to the reality of work soon. For the moment, I am en route to Cumbuco to pack and sort out gear.





Fortune does favour the bold

30 08 2010

Quick post to say I have finished the 2000km today, 30 days after I started. Yes I am pleased to finish and somewhat relived. I am looking forward to do some stress free kiting and waking up late.
The last 3 days were not really stress free kiting, finishing with a 40km open water crossing today.
The last 3 days have been some of the most epic kiting of the whole trip and I will do a full post in time. For the moment beer and food awaits!





Day 23

27 08 2010

A fantastic start to the day with breakfast served up at 5.15am this morning.

It felt like the longest offshore wind that I have experienced so far and with really light wind conditions.  The wind dropped down to 7 knots at times leaving me with no option to concentrate on keeping the kite flying at all costs. Eventually I made it back into land after 1.5 hours of being so far out I was only 3-4km from the oil drilling platforms. The reason for heading out so far out was to avoid the nearby river system and wind shadow which could have caused me lots of problems.

Globo, one of the big Brazilian TV channels ran a story on my trip a couple of days ago which has made me a bit of a celebrity out here.

So now when I land in what I think is the most random and remote place, people run up to me asking “are you the crazy guy we saw on TV.

The wind swung in the afternoon and picked up to a pleasant 17-20 knots which gave me an afternoon of stress free kiting right next to the beach.

I’m could get used to this stress free kiting, I’m so over the harsh offshore winds, sharp reefs, sharks and rain.